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Vice.com/Gaming Becomes Waypoint, Employs Danielle Riendeau and Rob Zacny

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Haha, no, I only got that one domain, which Austin hasn't yet managed to actually read out properly on the podcast, but whatever. I'm not responsible for bazinga.zone, or new.donk.city. I wish I'd had the inspiration to get the latter.

 

I did set up a handful of other redirects on that one domain, though. For example, http://austinwalkergames.games/myspace.

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Recognition! I'll have to check out the archive of the stream he mentioned. 

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There doesn't seem to be an Waypoint forum, so I guess this is the place to talk about it here?

I enjoyed episode 39 about We Are Chicago. I haven't played the game, but the discussion brings up a lot of interesting subjects for me. I was especially intrigued by Austin's frustration with the role of the mother as a moral authority. Again, I haven't played the game, but I think that the way a piece of media can put a spotlight on a character's monologue is an interesting subject when the character portrays an unrealistic (even damaging) view that is still true to that character. Are they a voice for the enlightened author? Or are they an honest depiction of that character's sensibility. It's an interesting debate that I'd like to see happen.

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I have a stub of a response there which is that I think it's hard to claim they're not a voice for an enlightened author when they're the singular moral authority. Showing individual characters' moral views to contrast and compare them is a fine goal if you have more than one to make it abundantly clear that there's non canonical worldview you're putting forward. But if you just show one angle, it gets taken as the angle.

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14 hours ago, SuperBiasedMan said:

I have a stub of a response there which is that I think it's hard to claim they're not a voice for an enlightened author when they're the singular moral authority. Showing individual characters' moral views to contrast and compare them is a fine goal if you have more than one to make it abundantly clear that there's non canonical worldview you're putting forward. But if you just show one angle, it gets taken as the angle.

 

Thanks for the stub. This is a good point. 

This has really gotten me thinking about how ideas of morality are presented by characters. Now I'm remembering how much I enjoyed the moralizing characters of Dragon Age:Origins. I like the idea of having numerous well-realized characters with passionate views based on their own fictional experiences that they express vocally and with actions.

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As someone from the southside of Chicago, I'd be curious on checking the game out - even if it's a kind of flawed morality tale. 

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I find it challenging to balance between my desires to have depictions of these subjects in fiction so that folks can have personal responses, and my concerns that the fictional representations will affirm oppressive norms.

 

Based on Patrick and Austin's description of the game and the role of the mother, I think there maybe more value in depicting a flawed ideology in the matriarchal authority (especially if we are supposed to share the perspective of the protagonist) rather than use her representation as a microphone for academic solutions to social problems.

 

I'd be really interested to see how it was received if the academic perspective was presented in the game by another character who the protagonist sees as irrelevant.

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My interpretation of their annoyance was that you experience this whole series of vignettes and scenes, and then the mother stands up at the end and moralizes like a 60 year old whose kids are out of the house, with basically no connection to anything else depicted. It was not that she was used as a mouthpiece, but literally the words she said.

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5 hours ago, Badfinger said:

My interpretation of their annoyance was that you experience this whole series of vignettes and scenes, and then the mother stands up at the end and moralizes like a 60 year old whose kids are out of the house, with basically no connection to anything else depicted. It was not that she was used as a mouthpiece, but literally the words she said.

 

What I'm suggesting is that if she moralized in the way Austin was suggesting would be better, then the game-makers may be in danger of using her as a mouthpiece.

The moral perspective that she expresses (as it was explained on the podcast) doesn't seem unlikely to me for that character. Again, I haven't played the game.

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For those people who might be twitter blocked at work, Rob Zacny is joining Waypoint as a senior editor starting today.

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