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Important If True 44: Stream Frasier Online Free

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Important If True 44:

Important If True 44


Stream Frasier Online Free
It's a brand new year, time for fresh starts, time to throw those old cares away. Well, we know that's easier said than done, so we'll try and take care of a few big questions we know are on everyone's mind going into 2018. Questions like: What is your roommate storing in his conspicuous model ship? Where can I watch free episodes of my favorite TV show, Frasier? And, if someone could inject memories of a fantastic vacation directly into a person's brain, would they charge more to give you one with lots of sleep? The answers, or a close enough facsimile, are right here. 

Discussed: "2018: Timeless," making the most from Patreon's short-lived new payment plan, Elves Behavin' Badly, Elf on the Shelf, Mensch on a Bench, learning to subvert your Elves Behavin' Badly security system, taking patently bad advice to heart and acting on it, robbing a store by squirting lemon juice on your face to hide your identity, algorithmic biases in Santa's Workshop, extricating yourself from an apartment when roommates have claimed all your stuff as their own, the time Nick Breckon finally hung out with his roommate for a night, creating your own Total Recall vacation, accidentally injecting yourself with the wrong Total Recall movie, itching vs scratching, borrowing vs lending, extreme pedantry, the evolution of language, American English as a melting pot, New York Times dialect quiz, Lexicon Valley podcast

Send us your questions at questions@importantiftrue.com. If you enjoyed this and would like to subscribe to an ad-free feed, please consider supporting Idle Thumbs by backing our Patreon.

Chris' Endorsement: The New York Times Crossword Puzzle (Website, iOS App)

Nick's Endorsement: Glowing Auras and ‘Black Money’: The Pentagon’s Mysterious U.F.O. Program, which is less of a missed gem now than it was when we recorded.

Jake's Endorsement: Harry Potter and the Portrait of what Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash, a predictive-text-assisted new novel in the Harry Potter series, and Megan Nicole Dong's Large Pile of Ash illustrations.

 

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Oh boy, UFOs! In 2014 or so I was obsessed with videos from "Citizen Hearings on Disclosure." Well staged speeches with former congress people with the attempt to break open the truth that UFOs are ET visitors.

 

This to me is such a brilliant smoke screen from new technologies. That the real conspiracy is that UFO's as ET's is a brilliant fiction to distract from the reality of UFO's as experimental new air craft. Drones, UAVs, are now a common place technology. This technology easily lines up with the images of UFO sightings from the 90s and 2000s. What better way to cover up and confuse people about experimental new technologies than to say it's fantastical alien technology. No matter that it's often seen in the skies of Arizona and Nevada where very relevant military bases for testing new aviation technologies exist.

 

ET's are a very cool fiction, and I too admit I've spent a long time wanting to believe in this. But I also used to be terrified of the apocalypse and look forward to an afterlife. So to me, the ET conspiracy is a brilliant play to prey on the ontological fantasy that there is an afterlife (here represented by life outside of Earth), that priests can indeed have direct communication with God (here represented with Earth governments actively collaborating with UFO visitors or technologies), or that there will be a rapture (that the aliens will let us visit their planets in their sweet flying saucers). The ET conspiracy realigns that fantasy to a less religious but still completely gullible public.

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Bad roommate story:

 

So in my sophomore year of undergrad, I was in a dorm that was basically a converted Holiday Inn or similar middle of the road hotel. All of the rooms had individual bathrooms, but were otherwise fairly cramped with two people in each of them. My roommate didn't give any indication from the start that he was a particularly odd person, except maybe his possession of a really large amount of stuff that he never seemed to use (fancy shoes, several laptops, etc.) As the semester went on, he got home later and later, usually falling asleep at 2-3 AM with his TV on. I didn't say anything, mostly because I was fairly cognizant that I hadn't been the best roommate in my first year and was willing to cut him some slack. In addition to this TV habit, an odd smell started developing about a month into the first semester. I thought it was his trashcan at first, and asked him to empty it a few times (he complied.) When that didn't help, I assumed it was his fairly large pile of dirty laundry, and asked him to wash those (he eventually did.) The smell eventually got bad enough that other people on the floor complained, and we had to start keeping our door shut all the time. My brain was used to the smell at this point, but other people insisted that it was one of the worst things they had ever smelled.

 

This went on until the last week of the first semester. Campus police showed up at my door like an hour before my last final and said they wanted to speak to my roommate, and when I said he wasn't there, to look through his stuff. Part of living in the dorms was agreeing that they could do that so I let them in. It turns out he had a bunch of stuff stashed that violated dorm rules (alcohol, drug paraphernalia, some other questionable substances. It was a Jesuit school) that they then asked me a bunch of questions about too. I was leaving for my final when he came back, and that was the last time I saw him. 

 

It turns out that the smell was caused by several large suitcases of luggage that had gotten soaked, but then were never opened to air out at any time during the semester. Either the police or the dorm staff dragged those off while I was gone. The rest of his stuff remained though, so I assumed he was going to show back up at some point. Then mail started arriving in our shared mailbox from the city courts, and then from the state courts. Eventually that stopped and the dorm ended up collecting the rest of his stuff. 

 

My ongoing theory is that he's a member of one of those distant Saudi royal families (based on some stuff he actually told me) and got involved in selling/buying drugs, then fled the country (or at least the state) once the police showed up. On the plus side, I got the room to myself in the second semester of that year.

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Thank you so much for answering the question about normalisation of surveillance which, in my heightened state of technological horror, I completely forgot to include in my email about Elves Misbehavin'.

 

The reviews on the camera's product page were also pretty depressing and unsettling in their own special ways:

 

 

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elf1.PNG

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Haven't gotten to the end of the pod yet, but Chris mentioned a burglar who thought he would be invisible to cameras because he was covered in lemon juice. I recently stumbled across this story myself when I was researching the Dunning-Kruger effect -- apparently it features prominently in the study for which the effect is named. What Chris didn't mention is that, as best as I can understand from the brief mention of the case in the Dunning-Kruger effect Wikipedia article, he believed that lemon juice would make him invisible because of some absurd misunderstanding of its actual application as invisible ink. Now, this sentence doesn't have any citation that verifies that, so I may just be passing along my own hoisting, but I'd prefer it to be true anyway.

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I have had bad housemates, but usually not to particularly comedic effect. Last shared place I lived in, I shared with a 30 year old couple who had been together since high school. 

They did a decent job when I checked the place out of appearing to have their shit as together as necessary, but it turned out the guy whose room I was moving into had been doing all the cleaning, and without him the place fell into incredibly disgusting, odorous disrepair. My room was an oasis in a desert of incredibly potent B.O., cat-shit, mould and decaying food smells. You couldn't walk through the kitchen without your shoes making that sticky noise, and when one day I went to clean the bathtub I found a Starburst Rattlesnake caked onto the outside of it, near the rim, covered in dust and dead bugs. I guess I'll never know how that happens

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The elf on the shelf thing is basically a garbage-ified version of an actual Christmas tradition my family had. We had this little elf that my parents would move to a different place in the house every night. It didn't have the connotation of being some kind of surveillance thing, he was just some magical elf guy and it was a fun game to find where he was hiding every morning. He would always be sitting on the TV or hanging from a lamp or something like that, so the "behavin' badly" aspect is probably just a product of the marketing machine, but the "christmas tradition" part might not be 100% manufactured bullshit.

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On 08/01/2018 at 11:13 AM, PK. said:

Thank you so much for answering the question about normalisation of surveillance which, in my heightened state of technological horror, I completely forgot to include in my email about Elves Misbehavin'.

 

The reviews on the camera's product page were also pretty depressing and unsettling in their own special ways:

 

 

efl4.PNG

elf1.PNG

elf2.PNG

elf3.PNG

 

As always, there's a Deus Ex quote apposite to this: "The need to be observed and understood was once satisfied by God. Now we can implement same functionality with data-mining algorithms." 
In fact, this is precisely the same "social normalisation via fear-of-observation" which most religions incorporate - which is also why "Santa Claus is Coming To Town" is the most disturbing of all Christmas songs. 

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