BonusWavePilot

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    The Sheik's sixth sheep

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    krane42

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  1. @Dingobloo I'll have to check this out... Badcoop might still have been pursuing Judy without having known she was referred to that way until late in the piece...
  2. Woah, good catch! It's funny how the search for clues in a show like this where small details might be relevant, and where the creators are unlikely to ever spell everything out makes the stakes of any continuity problems higher. This FBI pin theory seems to me to be a good example of that: another might be the guy shouting for Billy at the diner, followed by a suddenly different crowd of extras in the diner. In most other shows you would just assume a continuity glitch, but here it may actually be significant. This is further complicated by Lynch's methods meaning that it might start as a mistake and then get adopted if he likes it.
  3. @plasticflesh Ah yes, I had forgotten about Mr C's car flip being in a similar spot. (Perhaps given more weight by RichCoop driving the same model of old car as Badcoop for his first evening crossed over.) ...and I had completely missed that Carrie's was the same house! It would seem a bit foolhardy of Jerry to go climbing on that rock after he saw Richard getting toasted up there, although he did attribute the death to his binoculars, so possibly he wouldn't have connected it with the location. In this case, I suppose Richard's grisly end (presumably meant for Badcoop) was some kind of once-off trap, rather than a permanent change to a vortex at that spot.
  4. @plasticflesh Hmm, an interesting possibility... So if your friend is correct, Laura just called herself Carrie after escaping from Twin Peaks and its history of abuse? In this case, how is her lack of knowledge of the family home accounted for? I suppose she could just have repressed the memory of the place, but I would have expected her to be less co-operative with Coop's suggestion they travel back there if that were so, even if it does get her away from whatever happened with that body in her house. Does this explanation tie into the weirdness around Coop and Diane 'crossing over' somehow? I guess it could be the different reality Coop created by rescuing Laura beginning there, but Laura's body disappearing in the flashback would seem to indicate that Twin Peaks itself was affected too. On another note, apropos of nothing in particular, I really liked the randomness of some of the vortex locations. The ones at Jackrabbit's palace or above the convenience store at least seem portentous, but the vortex that Gordon investigates, and the location of the 'crossover' point are both in such unremarkable places that it seems plausible they could have been there for years without anyone noticing.
  5. @plasticflesh - some great thoughts in the Medium article you posted. I think some of it is purely speculative without much to back it up (which is inevitable in these kinds of theories), but definitely food for thought. I think I am least convinced by the idea of Laura acting as a 'bomb' by overloading Judy or other lodge spirits with garmonbozia. I don't think we've really seen or heard anything to the effect that garmonbozia is dangerous to the lodge spirits who are intent on gathering it. (Although Laura's origin as 'good' orb does seem to indicate that she is dangerous or at least opposed to the 'evil' orb types like Bob) I thought the idea of Coop & Diane's sex scene as conducting a ritual was quite resonant though - it could explain the pre-ordained feeling to Coop/Richard's instructions. (And possibly give some further motivation to rape-happy Badcoop other than just being an evil sort, particularly in the case of Diane, if he was also attempting to enact a ritual). I believe it possibly ties into some stuff from the Dossier about sex-magic too, but I have not read it. Then again, if we assume that Diane has split from Coop at the point where she sees herself outside the hotel, then the scene might just be Linda coming to terms with the fact that Richard is acting super-weirdly. I liked the concept of the alternate reality (or what the Medium article called 'The Cage') as being our real world, and having the actual owner of the location at which the Palmer House is filmed answer the door seems to reinforce this, but I'm not so sure about it having been constructed as a cage for Judy... The idea of the alternate reality being our own world in combination with the notion that Judy is the transliterated 交代 Jiāo Dài, or 'explanation' points to an interesting take where explanation of the show's mysteries is itself the worst possible evil, in which case I suppose Goodcoop as investigator seeking answers stands in for the audience, and oversteps into dangerous territory when he actually makes it into the real world... Not sure exactly what that would parallel... Maybe trying to use ideas about the motivation/psychology of the author to analyse events of the show?
  6. Hmmm, I like this theory except for the Mr C stuff... I think Coop is acting differently from the moment he emerges from the lodge: it is most obvious after he and Diane 'pass through', but even his interaction with her immediately upon emerging is quite un-Coop-like. The kiss before they cross for example already seems strange and uncomfortable... That said, it is definitely the sex scene with Diane that most drives it home - Coop's blank face and near-immobile participation are a hell of a counterpoint to Dougie and Janey-e's scene with Dougie's equally passive, but considerably more joyful interaction. Actually, in a way, the scene with Diane is what I was afraid the scene with Janey was going to be (sans the silly floppy arms) until the camera showed Dougie's face.
  7. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demiurge Interesting! Particularly in light of the theories that 'Judy' is a transliteration of that Chinese phrase that relates to 'knowing' or explanation.
  8. @Digger "You know it wants the food or the toy, and you are enjoying its reaction, and then continuing to promise and withhold is disrespectful." I think we can reasonably assume that Lynch & Frost know we want certain things, but 'you are enjoying its reaction' is supposition, and when was any promise made? "You'll never know, and I've not given you enough information to understand." But why do you assume you have a right to? If they want to make something where there isn't enough information to be sure about anything, when did they agree to do otherwise? I get why the things you mention are frustrating, or not how you wish this was made, but I still can't get to disrespect, because I don't think we were owed or promised anything different. Lynch and Frost are not beholden to our expectations. (Well, not in an artistic sense anyway. Perhaps financially, but I don't think either of them are likely to starve if TP bombs)
  9. @Digger Well, if owed is not the concept to use, then by what measure can the choices in the series be disrespectful? Otherwise it can be contrary to expectation, but the notion of respect doesn't come into it. Of course Twin Peaks is as open to reading and critique as anything else, and of course artists can offend or their work can miss the mark. My point is that if you and a creator have different ideas of where that mark is, do you think you have a right to demand that they move to meet your definition? "These are characters and a world that has been pored over, examined and loved for over 25 years. The characters, place and feel have been internalized. I believe an audience can have expectations and opinions." Sure - there are a lot of us who really like this thing. I don't agree that this means we ought to have any say over how it is made.
  10. I guess part of what makes me want to argue this is the idea of Lynch being 'disrespectful' or similar, as it raises the question, what are we owed? I don't actually have an answer just at the moment, but I think the idea of viewing this as a contract between Lynch and his audience is an interesting one. What do we owe, for that matter?
  11. This was a disturbing scene. The way I took it was that Diane recognised the change in Cooper since they had 'crossed over', and this is what was disturbing her - hence her attempts to cover RichardCoop's face. (Or alternatively, if she was looking at it from the other side, she was alarmed by the change in Richard)
  12. I think Badcoop has had black irises for the whole run...
  13. Oh sure, I'm not claiming that Lynch did any of this by accident. Cockney Freddie and the magic gardening glove is no more ridiculous than super-strong teenage-minded Nadine, or Ben Horne's civil war obsession, to my mind. It is true that the wackier stuff existed more in pockets than as a vein throughout this season though. All of which said, I'm not exactly arguing that I found the finale entirely satisfying myself, but I didn't find it retroactively changed my enjoyment of the earlier episodes. I think I prefer something unsatisfyingly strange over a pat everything-comes-together sort of ending though, if I had to go one extreme or the other.
  14. "...so many scenes ultimately served no purpose..." What purpose is a scene allowed to serve? Does it have to be literally advancing the plot? As an example - the languid pace: what sort of conclusion would have justified it for you? I think it was mostly tonal - a way of dragging out the impatience and suspense. Does anything that is not completely explained count as 'discarded'? How is there any room for 'enigmatic' in that arrangement? When you have an explanation, you no longer have an enigma. "Some of it was a joke to him, the rest was contempt for the viewer." Did you get his autograph during the discussion where you established this? I'm happy to argue just about any interpretation of the work, but I think that attributing authorial motive is a much trickier question, especially in a work this inscrutable. Personally I find it unlikely that someone would throw their lives into making 18 hours of television just as a show of contempt, or that if they had, that this season is what we would have ended up with.
  15. Here, here! Thanks Jake & Chris! Wondering how you are both going to react or interpret something has become an integral part of my TP enjoyment, and has helped ensure interesting elements don't slip by unnoticed. While we're at it, thanks to you forumites for the discussion, and to the forum mods for helping keep it civil. Compared to a lot of places online this feels like a friendly environment, which I know doesn't happen without work.