Ash_NR

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About Ash_NR

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  1. I have to wonder what ads are served up to Chris "Feed me memes, fetch my shoehorn" Remo. "He doesn't fit into any of these boxes", a pair of box sorting robots say to one another.
  2. Late to the party, but just finished listening to the audiobook. Not sure I want to go back and read the book. But I'll echo that I most enjoyed the Hawk and Jacoby sections, they felt sincere and added a bit more flesh to those bones. As far as spoilers go I think I might posit:
  3. This jam was very much a head down get stuff down jam. Diving deeper into Lua than I have before, and ever with Pico-8, I really miss a heavily typed language. I struggled to keep my code clean for a bit, undoing some lazy hacks. But I was very happy with how easy I got a simple but effective state machine going. I wasn't able to get a nice animation going for all the movement in the game, so that is far more static than I liked. But I did manage to put in highlight functionality that shows what "that" move would actually do. So I am going to call this release a release, it still needs sound and music, but the loop is there and I think Mancala really works with this theming. You can find the game here https://itch.io/jam/wizard-jam-4/rate/101679
  4. Really late in getting my dev log up. But here I am, I am basing my jam game of Episode 247 of Idle Thumbs, The Clone Progenitors. Although not part of the official diversifiers, I am using these ones from the short list for my own motivation: · The classics: Create a version of an old game, eg. checkers, poker, backgammon. Add twists if you want, but there’s more to these games than you might think. · Hard mode - Learn a new engine/IDE by making your first game using it during the jam. Hard mode is me using Pico-8 for the first real time in actually making something. This has actually proven to be more difficult than I thought. It's implementation of Lua is a bit rougher than the standard, and so my code has been far less flexible than I'd like. As for the classics, I've decided to meld the awesome bean-moving game Mancala, and Tharsis which was discussed in that episode. The game follows mancala in that seeds need to be sent to put into a scoring modules, they are the left-most and right-most circles in the screenshots below. Where it differs from Mancala is that it is only a single player game. The conflict comes from random "events" like Tharsis, modules will become compromised and all "seeds" will need to be moved along to a different module otherwise they all will perish. Get as many seeds on to the scoring modules to evacuate them from the ship. As of right now I've got the basic rules of Mancala in the game. I am still working on balancing random events, and how to repair modules. And I really need to work on making stuff pretty!
  5. Another update. Put in a timer and enabled the difficulty selection that I hadn't got around to toggle in the game.
  6. I think that is totally fine though. Pick a goal that is doable, learn something new, that's all I want from jams.
  7. That looks incredible. I am such a fan of good scoping in jams, and I think that scope of this is just perfect! Plus Olly's droolworthy art! I was hoping for a sun-drenched Goldblum resting on a gurney in the background.
  8. So late in updating the forum post. Getting sick during the jam wasn't great, so I wasn't able to concentrate on making some dodgy sprites to reflect being a door-to-door salesperson. But game is done and can be found here: https://ash-nr.itch.io/with-free-monster-samples I'll work on getting some gifs of the game in action. Basically the player has to get rid of their Monster energy drink samples by tapping on the doors of people in the skyscraper. The occupant responds with an emoticon and the player has to match with the correct tap. There are 4 tiers of emoticons, so the longest "morse" string will be 4 taps long. At the moment I've set the game to only randomly select from the first 2 tiers of emoticons, so 6 potential options to input. If I get a second I'll add an instructions screen and an input to select for Easy, Medium, Hard. Instructions are on the itch.io page. Hope you enjoy it, and I'm looking forward to giving all the games a whirl!
  9. Thanks, I hope there is a somewhat logical progression throughout them. Tomorrow after work is going to be visualising the input buffer code.
  10. Alrighty! Spent most of today and last night working on 30 emoticons to use for the game. Turns out it was more outputs than I thought. And I think I'll need to had a difficulty switch because I think that diving in with 30 potentials options is far too hard. But basically like nkornek suggested, a maximum of four inputs, with 2 different states per input. Not all 4 inputs need to be used. So a single dot or dash in morse will result in an answer. I felt it was important that any input was valid and not that there was a "code" to figure out. So each of the 4 inputs correspond to a different element in a smiley emoticon, 3 of them are physical differences, and the final one is a more abstract concept. A dot (short tap) is a negative or 0 input, and dash (longer tap) corresponds to a positive or input of 1. I hope to elaborate a little in the game what those 4 categories are to help people catalogue what each input does. I hope that there is enough of a indicator in the to show progression down a tree of outputs.
  11. The game over screen has to be Losin' surely!
  12. Yay, a Rigid Body Rat King! You're right, I thought there would be a lot of these! It's looking good but I think you're game is lacking a " : Ratamari Damacy"
  13. Hmmm, I was thinking about some sort of foreign or derived language but I figured that would be too vague or confusing to the player. But it would certainly be more interesting than a stale greeting. I'll mull over it while I work on the input buffer today. Thanks!
  14. Those pens man, real nice! My son will be keen to see this project.
  15. That episode conveys the gameplay so perfectly! An idea that I had is the enemy sprite's arm is always locked to the player's direction and their body will respond to physics as if that everyone has been told to respond to impacts with John Woo like dives. Man world of blanks, so good!