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About Punggung

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  1. New people: Read this, say hi.

    Hi there, I'm not a forum person really, but I like the mood and topic of this place so I might pop in for a question or two.
  2. Turning rpg:s into improv games?

    Hey guys and gals! Thanks for the suggestions. The exercise went off without a hitch, but I think we won't retry the RPG-style games I had designed. On the other hand we still regularly play the other new games I used as templates for them. We're setting up an RPG group now, and we have found the perfect game to kick it off with: Fiasco. It's like a mix of RPG and longform improv. Merus: Ever played Balderdash? Seems very similar to its main mechanic, guessing the correct meaning of an obscure word among one correct and several written by players. In general I tried to introduce competition elements but aside from overt contests the players simply didn't play along with them, instead feeling more comfortable resolving scenes more traditionally. What did work somewhat was to introduce special powers, like one player being able to at will initiate flashback scenes, and character development, where characters started being defined by a weakness but by overcoming an obstacle instead came to have the opposite strength. Shy to assertive, hydrophobic to hydrophilic, controlling to openminded.
  3. Episode 271: The Last Express

    I liked this discussion a lot. There was another really good take on it at the Moving Pixels Podcast a few years back. https://soundcloud.com/popmatters/moving-pixels-podcast-16
  4. Hiya guys! I'm a lover of all forms of interactive entertainmen: video games, rpg:s and theatre. I'm going to hold an improv exercise with a gaming and competitive mechanics theme at my local theatre club, so I'm thinking of various ways of converting the systems of 'game' games into faster and looser improv games. Often the rewards in improv are simple, the laughter of the audience, getting to stay up on stage, guiding the direction of the story. In order to make challenges or settings a bit more rule-bound I think I could try to constrain the reward systems. One exercise could be: three persons on stage, they have a character weakness each, there is a challenge in the scene such that only a strong effort of one or many players can clear it, as reward the players who cleared the challenge gets to overcome their weakness, they end the scene when the outcome is obvious. A variant can use status as the placeholder for other weaknesses, letting them go from low to high or vice versa. How could we gamify this a bit more? One way is to force a ranking, let the players feel who weighed in the most vs least and let their transformation be the most or least. Another can be to add some kind of points that they have to bet on their actions. We could also try to qualify the challenge somewhat more, like having a series of distinct requirements for it to be cleared. Another exercise: three persons on stage, one is a game master and does not control a character but have the power to define the setting or outcomes of actions, the others are actors who only author their own characters, the GM defines some challenge and narrates the outcomes of the players actions, the scene ends when the challenge is cleared or they fail. A gamification here could be that the players both win if they work together, but if one of them clears the challenge alone then s/he and the GM wins. What do you think of ways to merge rpg mechanics with improv? Any input on my examples?